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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
recommended bed in america. >>> new nuclear fears in japan. officials say a partial meltdown is likely happening now and multiple meltdowns are a real possibility. >>> unbelievable amateur video at the moment the tsunami hit. water pouring in, flooding cars and everything in its way in miyako, japan. more amazing pictures next. hi, everybody. great to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. this is the continuing coverage of the disaster in japan. it's 12 noon in the east and 2:00 a.m. monday in japan. three major stories developing now in that country. up first, sobering words from japan's prime minister. he says the earthquake and tsunami disaster is the nation's worst crisis since world war ii. meanwhile, workers at a nuclear power plant hit by the earthquake and tsunami are trying to keep temps down to prevent the disaster from grewing worse. the escalating crisis includes the threat of multiple meltdowns. >>> more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12-mile radius around nuclear plants. japan's chief cabinet secretary says nine people tested positive for high ra
earthquakes the world has ever seen. 8.9 quake hting japan overnight. the waves now barreling towards the u.s. pictures we are seeing out of japan are unimaginable. it's wave after wave literally swallowing up cars, boats and homes. some terrifying moments in an airport outside of tokyo when the quake hit. watch this video. now there is one report. you find the capital city of tokyo. that report that confirmed. but an earthquake of horrific proportions causing buildings to shake and the tsunami that followed. seldom have we seen images like this. welcome to "america's newsroom." martha: this quake struck just after 3:00 p.m. local time in japan while most of us were sleeping. this was the scene. unbelievably powerful waves crashing ashore causing wired spread destruction. there are massive fires being dealt with and a nuclear emergency. we have more details on that. bill: there was so much to watch and do have, we'll do our best it, the 7th largest earthquake ever record. it's the largest to hit japan. evacuations underway in several coastal towns. trace gallagher joins us with more on that
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. a massive military relief and recovery operation is under way in japan this morning, after that 8.9 magnitude earthquake that devastated the island. >>> an explosion at a nuclear power plant has raised fears of a meltdown. hundreds are dead, and that number will most certainly rise. we have full coverage "early" this saturday morning, march 12th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> video from less than 30 hours ago in japan, devastating earthquake, 8.9 magnitude. at this hour the official death toll almost 600. and there are other big problems looming this morning. welcome to "the early show" on this saturday morning, i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we will continue to follow this story as it develops throughout the morning. >> let's get right to the earthquake in japan of course. the quake is the fifth largest in recorded history. it was followed by a 23-foot high tsunami. the official death count is 574 dead. the number expected to rise considerably. almost 600 are still missing. there have been more than 125
. >> a fox urgent, nuclear crisis in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live with a special edition of fox report. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdowns and frantically trying to cool down the reactors with sea water and are' looking at the two plants in question, fukushima where there's been at least one explosion and the other, where we're getting word now radiation levels have dropped back to normal after what they're doing there for the problem. japan's prime minister speaking about friday's twin disasters, the earthquake and tsunami and now the nuclear threat. his words through a translator. >> 65 years after the end of world war ii, this is the toughers and most difficult for japan in that period. >> harris: we're just starting to get some satellite images. this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before on the left side of the screen and after. you can see how a torrent of tsunami driven mud ripped through the covered ground here. the government confirming now more than 2500 buildings in that city destroyed. scientists have just revised their estimates now how big that earth
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
official here in the united states says that the primary containment structure of those reactors in japan, it looks like has breached. it raises the risk now of a further release of radioactive material. let's go right to tokyo now. msnbc chris jansing is standing by. i received a note the winds have shifted and are blowing over the pacific sxnt over tokyo. i'm sure people there are very concerned. >> reporter: it's been a very concerning situation because there have been levels, low levels i need to emphasize that of radiation here in tokyo. it has caused enough of a red flag that the french government has advised its citizens to leave the capital. the austrian government is moving its embassy here to osaka. u.s. embassy officials nbc news has learned had a meeting earlier today with folks who work there, with their families to try to elay some of the concerns of americans living here in tokyo. it has been confirmed for us. we talked to people involved in the meeting that several people stood up and said, should i stay or should i go? that is the question a lot of people, especially peop
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
ahead. >>> good evening. i'm jenk uygur. three days after a massive earthquake and tsunami hit japan, the devastated country continued to reel today. police officials estimate more than 10,000 people were killed when one village was washed away from the tsunami-ravaged northern coast. the death toll is certain to rise. as day breaks in japan, it's a race against time to find survivors. officials say some 350,000 people are homeless and staying in shelters. as you can see the pictures there, it is absolutely devastation. you can see why there are so many people homeless. their homes are gone. emergency workers are frantically trying to cool down the reactors at the troubled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant, located about 60 miles south of the earthquake's epicenter. there have already been two explosions at this power plant, generating from reactors one and three, first on saturday and then a second one today. today's blast injured 11 people and government authorities told people within 12 miles to stay indoors. if i was them, i would not stay indoors, i would run for the hills.
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
in radiation drives out the last line of defense, as another fire flares up at japan's crippled nuclear plant. >>> and the fukushima 50. new details this morning about the heroic team, facing death, working inside the scariest ut place on earth. even helicopters sent to spray the plant, turned back because of major danger, as aftershocks shake tokyo. >>> could the meltdown happen here? "gma" takes you inside an american working plant, to show what the workers face every day. >>> and the rush to buy iodine pills and radiation detectors. but just how worried should we be? >>> and good morning, america. an incredible story unfolding at that nuclear plant. the workers pulled out overnight, because of radiation levels. and they're standing by to go back in at this very hour, likely exposing themselves to so much more radiation. >> just to give a sense of how much risk they are facing, back to the chernobyl disaster. almost 50 of the workers there sacrificed their lives. more than 100 had radiation illness. since you all went to sleep, here's what happened. a new fire broke out at one of the fukush
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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